DIY Wooden Easter Eggs for Kids

IMG_3312I have three girls, so we are legitimately drowning in seasonal crafts at any given time of year. It’s not that I don’t love the stuff my girls make, but many of the things they make at church or school aren’t very functional or made for saving. So when I decide to have the girls make something at home, it’s got to be something we can save easily and won’t take up too much space.

Last year, I came up with the idea of having them paint wooden Easter eggs. It was cheap, easy, and fun for them, and all three could do it, even though my youngest was just one at the time. They also didn’t take up much space, and could be used as decorations the next year. I also had each child make an attempt at writing their name or even just “their” letter on the bottom, and I wrote the year.

IMG_3296You can really go as simple or fancy as you like, using ribbon, washi tape, sequins or other decorations on your eggs. You can also seal them if you like, but I left mine unsealed so that the older ones would have a nice broken-in look as the years wore on.

Another variation on this idea is these DIY salt-dough eggs. Stick some birch branches in a vase, and hang them up year after year.

These will be really cute to look at as they get older and more skilled at decorating and at writing their names. I also look forward to having little Easter eggs to decorate the house with. In a few years, I could even fill one of these cute easter egg vases with them!

Wooden Easter EggsIMG_3298

One egg per child
One color of craft paint per child
One paintbrush per color
One paper plate per color
Sharpie marker
Sealer

Spread out napkins or newspaper over your painting surface, or go outside if it’s not cold where you are. Squirt some of each color on a paper plate and assign a color to each child. Let each child paint their egg with that color, and when everyone is done, rotate the colors. Continue until they are done painting. Let the eggs dry, then add name and year to the bottom with a Sharpie. When each egg is fully dry, seal.

Erin Hayes Burt

Erin Hayes Burt

Erin Burt is a freelance writer and mom of three girls. She enjoys yoga and reading non chick-lit fiction when she's not translating the ramblings of toddlers or training for her next half marathon.
Erin Hayes Burt

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Erin Burt is a freelance writer and mom of three girls. She enjoys yoga and reading non chick-lit fiction when she's not translating the ramblings of toddlers or training for her next half marathon.


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